In a new interview discussing his latest album, the critically acclaimed Western Stars, Bruce Springsteen attempted to fit the collection into the big picture of his 45-year-career. "The Boss" told Mojo, "It may be the theme of everything I do -- isolation and involvement, commitment and ambivalence. The struggle in front of me, in my home, was between those two polarities. Consequently it became the root of everything I wrote -- and really still is. I'm always writing the next song, trying to find out where I fall in that equation."

Springsteen, who's already completed the writing of the next E Street Band album, went on to say of the solo Western Stars material, "It was a record I was making when I stopped and made Wrecking Ball. So I've been making it for a long time. I went back home and said, 'Well, I have that record that remains unfinished,' and I worked on finishing that over the summer (of 2015)."

He spoke about the upcoming E Street Band sessions and how Western Stars will fit into future full band shows: "I'm just sitting on it right now. The next opening we have, we'll slot it in. We'll be presenting this record to people. And it'll find its spot."

Bruce Springsteen continues to create new work in the hopes of further connecting with his core base of fans: "It deepens your relationship with you're audience, y'know, that's been my pursuit since I've started and continues to be so today. Y'know, I'm trying to deepen my conversation about life in general. Things that hopefully matter to me and hopefully matter to them and Martin Scorsese once said, 'The job of the artist is to get the audience to care about your obsessions, and to meet you in the middle, and to see what you have in common.'"

Bruce Springsteen says that he's comfortable at how his career has evolved, and the freedom of having a lot of creative ventures and music outlets at his disposal: "The nice place about where we're at, at this point, is, is we're pretty free to do whatever we want, y'know? We can go out and play a little bit if we wanted to, we don't have to have a record out -- sort of not being central is, gives you a lot of freedom to just make your music."

AUDIO: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN SAYS HE FEELS FREE TO GO OUT AND DO HIS OWN THING MUSICALLY
AUDIO: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN ON CONNECTING WITH HIS AUDIENCE