The massive success of Bruce Springsteen's Springsteen On Broadway did not carry over to the opening weekend for "The Boss's" big screen concert film, Western Stars. The Hollywood Reporter posted the film raked in a paltry $530,000 from 537 theaters over the weekend, with an average of $1,042 per theater. With the addition of the two nights the movie played via Fathom Events, all told, Western Stars stiffed, earning only $1 million at the box office.

Paul Dergarabedian of Comscore shed light on why the film under-performed, explaining, "While it seems that everyone loves Bruce Springsteen, a documentary showcasing the performance of his new album in its entirety may have been a draw strictly for the die-hard fans and thus was unable to break out to a broader audience. But you have to appreciate it when a studio serves the content and the artists involved, not just the bottom line."

Following the film's premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival, Bruce Springsteen revealed what the West represented to him in artistic terms: "I grew up in the '50s and so, the Western was king. And I wanted my music to be more than just local. So, when I was writing I thought about how to draw from all different parts of the country. Right from Darkness On The Edge Of Town, I started to set songs in Utah or in the Southwest somewhere. And there's just something just iconically Western; y'know, whether it was Henry Fonda or Gary Cooper -- those were all your icons of adulthood and manhood, y'know, when you were growing up. So, it all just naturally just seeps into your bones."

On November 4th, Bruce Springsteen will once again headline the annual "Stand Up For Heroes" benefit at the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden.

AUDIO: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN ON SETTING HIS MUSIC IN THE WEST