Coming on September 6th is the latest Allman Brothers Band vault release -- Fillmore West 1971. The four-disc set features the original, classic lineup of the band -- Gregg and Duane Allman, Dickey Betts, Jaimoe, Butch Trucks, and Berry Oakley -- and was taped at the legendary San Francisco venue on January 29th, 30th, and 31st, 1971.

Highlights on the collection include "Statesboro Blues," "In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed," "Whipping Post," "Midnight Rider," "Don’t Keep Me Wondering," an early version of "Hot 'Lanta," along with a previously unreleased version of "Mountain Jam," recorded live in March 1970 at The Warehouse in New Orleans.

Rolling Stone reported, "The recordings on Fillmore West were culled from the original reel-to-reel soundboard masters. Allman Brothers archivist Kirk West tracked down the tapes, which had previously been in the possession of band crew members Twiggs Lyndon, Joe Dan Petty, and Mike Callahan. As the masters had been stored in closets and attics for many years, transferring and restoring the tapes took several attempts over several years, with sound quality improving as the technology did."

Galadrielle Allman (pronounced GOLLA-dree-ELL), the daughter of late-guitarist Duane Allman has published the biography Please Be With Me: A Song For My Father. She also helped compile the recent seven-disc set, Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective, and told us that although only two at the time of her father's fatal motorcycle crash on October 29th, 1971 -- he's still been around to help guide her along the way: "I've been sort of parented by the music. Y'know, the lessons of the music, and the spirit of it, and the passion of it, has been a hugely instructive thing in my life. So, in that way, it is him for me. I was talking about Warren Haynes about it last night, that, y'know, the leaps between '69 and '70 there's a leap between (laughs) '70 and '71 there's a huge leap. It's like what would '72 have brought him? Y'know, he was really deeply engaged in constantly learning."

AUDIO: GALADRIELLE ALLMAN ON DUANE ALLMANS MUSICAL PROGRESS