In what's highly regarded as perhaps the rock book of the year, author Andrew Grant Jackson's 1973: Rock At The Crossroads holds something for everybody. Jackson made a name for himself with the recent classics --1965: The Most Revolutionary Year In Music, and Still The Greatest: The Essential Songs Of The Beatles' Solo Careers. His 1973 tome is as factual as it is readable, leaving no stone unturned in what may prove to be the most important and pivotal year in popular music.

We asked Andrew Grant Jackson to give us the broad strokes of what fans can expect in 1973: "It's the story of how rock peaks, dies, and was reborn in the same year. Because you had the '60s titans -- it was the last year that they released great albums and singles at the same time the former-Beatles, and (Rolling) Stones, and (Bob) Dylan, and (Led) Zeppelin, the Who, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, James Brown -- Elvis (Presley), even. Then you had all these people who had been around a while, they suddenly went to the top of the pack, like David Bowie, Elton John, Pink Floyd, Bob Marley."

Jackson went on to explain that the year was the bridge between the old guard and the groundbreaking new music that forged a path towards the rest of the 1970's and beyond: "You had this amazing group of new superstars who came out with their debut albums -- (Bruce) Springsteen, Billy Joel, Queen, Aerosmith, New York Dolls, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Tom Waits -- that's half the book. And the other half is it was a real interesting time because the birth of 'Album Oriented Rock' -- but under the radar, all these great vital new genres were beginning to percolate, like punk, and disco, and hip hop, and reggae, and outlaw country, and female rockers, and techno. They would eventually rise and rejuvenate music."

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AUDIO: ANDREW GRANT JACKSON ON CHANGES IN ROCK IN 1973
AUDIO: ANDREW GRANT JACKSON ON THE ROCKERS OF 1973