The 34th annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame takes place tonight (March 29th) at Brooklyn's Barclays Center. The 2019 class includes Def Leppard, Stevie Nicks, the Zombies, Janet Jackson, the Cure, Radiohead, and Roxy Music. To be eligible for this year's ballot, each nominee's first single or album had to have been released in 1993 or earlier. HBO will broadcast a truncated version of the ceremony later in the year.

For the seventh consecutive year, the public had the opportunity to vote alongside the more than 800 artists, historians and music industry insiders of the Rock Hall voting body -- with Def Leppard snagging the coveted "fan vote."

The inductors for the 2019 Rock Hall are:

Queen's Brian May for Def Leppard

Harry Styles for Stevie Nicks

Janelle Monae for Janet Jackson

Duran Duran’s John Taylor & Simon Le Bon for Roxy Music

The Bangles' Susanna Hoffs for The Zombies

David Byrne for Radiohead

Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails for The Cure

All of the inductees are expected to perform tonight -- including a reunited Roxy Music, save for drummer Paul Thompson and Brian Eno -- who'll will be unable to attend after vowing to not fly for a year in an effort to reduce his "carbon footprint."

Def Leppard drummer Rick Allen revealed that although some bands that span the decades soldier on despite deep inner-band turmoil, Leppard are still a bunch of dudes that love hanging out and making music together: "I think the saving grace is we still like each (laughs) other. We can all hang out in the same room, y'know what I mean? We don't take separate cars, we don't have separate hotels. And I think a lot of the success we had was fantastic. But honestly, I think a band grows from some of the not so good times. Like, losing (founding guitarist) Steve Clark and, y'know, my accident. I think that's been really important for us, and it's really sad to see other bands not quite being a team."

Def Leppard had a hunch that 2019 would be their year to enter the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame when they immediately led, then won, the fan vote -- but remained unsure until the official announcement. We caught up with frontman Joe Elliott, who explained to us how the news came down to the band while on the road in Europe during an early morning hustle to their next gig: "We got the news in Glasgow, so when we all got on the bus, there was a lot of, 'Hey, Hall Of Famer! How ya doin'?' High-fiving and hugging and stuff like that at 10 o'clock in the morning as best you can when you just woke up. So, it wasn't like a movie, where it was champagne and there was balloons and stuff -- it wasn't one of them kind of things. It was mid-tour. We took it in our stride, 'cause we are a working band -- and it was just another bit of information coming towards us that day that was one of many things that we were dealing with. But it was, like, 'Yeah! We're in -- great!"

Back in 1983, only two years into her solo career, Stevie Nicks explained that fronting and leading her own band was hardly a walk in the park compared to the cushy existence she and her bandmates enjoyed in Fleetwood Mac: "I don't feel like a princess anymore. I feel like a hard working princess, because I am called upon now to do a lot more that I never really thought I wanted to do. I never really wanted to be a solo artist. I never wanted to go up there and stand and sing 20 songs alone. I loved being in Fleetwood Mac, because it was a band."

Stevie Nicks believes the art of songwriting is an act of healing for both the creator and the listener: "To me, the music is writing songs and that is to be able to write something that maybe at a time in somebody else's life, they need a little help or a little inspiration, or something, that they would sit down and listen to something I wrote and it would just either make them feel a little better or they'd be able to go 'Somebody else's been there, too -- and that helps me.'"

The Zombies' Colin Bluntsone told us that he feels great pride that the group has finally been recognized by the Hall: "It's always difficult when you're trying to think about your own band and yourself. I've been thrilled that we've been nominated. It's just extra special that we've been inducted; and there are so many great bands out there, to try and think of yourself as better than any of them is a little strange, I think, really. I'm just incredibly grateful that we've had this huge honor."

A while back, Radiohead drummer Phil Selway and bassist Colin Greenwood told us that award shows and accepting grandiose public accolades aren't really the band's cup of tea: "(Phil Selway): "It's amazing the music industry and the film industry are the only areas that have to actually congratulate themselves in public, which. . . it's a spectacle. . ." (Colin Greenwood): "You're right. It should be done in private, like masturbation, really, shouldn't it? It really shouldn't be done in public. They're the only two industries that jerk off in public, y'know?"

Janet Jackson has been recording and performing for most of her life and told us she hasn't stopped to think about age or slowing down, and remains grateful to still be able to do what she loves: "I love music and always saw myself as doing music, and it's been good to me and people have always been interested in what I had to give. And I'm very fortunate that there's and interest that still stands after all these years. I really enjoy what I do and I think you have to have done do it as long as I have. And I'm very thankful that I've had a such a long career, and not just a long career but a very successful career."

Cure frontman Robert Smith told us what he set out to accomplish with his band's early records. "Some of the stuff is pretty extreme stuff, and I had huge ambition to be an artist to be reckoned with. I wanted to make music that had never been made before. I wanted people to feel things they had never felt before. And I've always felt that all the way through, I've never kind of lost sight of that."

Bryan Ferry says that just like on stage, he works better in the studio when fronting a band during the recording process: "(I'm) probably a much better singer when I'm singing with the band. I think that you perhaps get a bit more focused if you think, 'Well, I've got to try and do this in one take, otherwise I look bad.' If you're just there with the engineer, y'know, singing, you, you get into kind of a many-take-type scenario, which. . . Although, I mean, some great records have been made like that. I mean, Al Green used to spend days, apparently, working on a song -- on the vocals, y'know? I used to love his records."

AUDIO: STEVIE NICKS ON SHYING AWAY FROM BEING A SOLO ARTIST
AUDIO: JANET JACKSON ON HER SUCCESSFUL CAREER
AUDIO: RADIOHEAD TALKS AWARD SHOWS
AUDIO: JOE ELLIOTT OF LEARNING OF ROCK HALL INDUCTION
AUDIO: COLIN BLUNTSTONE ON THE ZOMBIES ROCK HALL INDUCTION
AUDIO: RICK ALLEN ON DEF LEPPARD STILL BEING A TEAM
AUDIO: STEVIE NICKS ON HELPING FANS THROUGH MUSIC
AUDIO: BRYAN FERRY SAYS HE'S BETTER WITH A BAND IN THE STUDIO THAN HE IS ALONE
AUDIO: THE CURE'S ROBERT SMITH ON WHAT HE SET OUT TO ACCOMPLISH IN THE EARLY DAYS