AC/DC’S UPCOMING ALBUM LIKELY TITLED ‘PWR UP’

All signs are pointing to AC/DC‘s first album in six years being named PWR UP. NME reported that only the day after spotlighting a blinking neon thunderbolt on the band’s social media platforms, the new “PWR UP” declaration has popped up in a few UK newspapers and uniquely, “on a poster located outside Sydney, Australia’s Ashfield Boys High School — where guitarist Angus Young spent his teenage years.”

Frontman Brian Johnson told us that he’s noticed one thing when watching footage of the group shot years ago: “There’s one important thing I think is very important, is we’ve never changed. The band has never, ever changed. As one interviewer said to Angus (Young), ‘Y’know, you’ve made 15 albums, Angus, and they’re all the same.’ And Angus said, ‘That’s not true. We’ve made 17 albums, and they’re all the same.'”

AUDIO: BRIAN JOHNSON SAYS AC/DC NEVER CHANGES

SINGER-SONGWRITER MAC DAVIS DEAD AT 78

Singer-songwriter Mac Davis died on September 29th at the age of 78 after suffering a heart attack in Nashville, according to Tennessean.com. When starting out, the Lubbock, Texas-born Davis wrote several hits for Elvis Presley — including the standards, “In The Ghetto,” “Don’t Cry Daddy,” “Memories,” and “A Little Less Conversation.”

As a solo artist, Davis was a staple of 1970’s Top 40, TV, and film — with such major hits as the 1972 three-week chart-topper “Baby Don’t Get Hooked On Me,” the Top Ten “Stop And Smell The Roses,” and the Top 20 hits “One Hell Of A Woman,” and “Rock N’ Roll (I Gave You The Best Years Of My Life).” Davis was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2000.

As an actor, Davis will be best remembered for his NBC variety show The Mac Davis Show, which ran from 1974 to 1976, and his co-starring role in 1979’s North Dallas Forty.

Not too long ago, we caught up with Mac Davis and asked him about submitting some of his most enduring songs to “The King,” Elvis Presley: “‘In The Ghetto,’ I had been. . . I wrote that, just for my own satisfaction, and after the (1968 ‘comeback’) special, after ‘Memories’ became a hit, he wanted to go down to Memphis and cut some serious stuff, and I gave him everything I had and the first two songs on the tape were ‘In The Ghetto,’ and ‘Don’t Cry Daddy.'”

AUDIO: MAC DAVIS ON ‘INTHE GHETTO’

SINGER HELEN REDDY DEAD AT 78

Canadian singer Helen Reddy died at the age of 78 on September 29th. Reddy will forever be remembered for her string of 15 Top 40 hits — including her signature 1972 chart-topper, “I Am Woman,” and her subsequent Number Ones — “Delta Dawn” from 1973 and 1974’s “Angie Baby.”

Helen Reddy was the first Australian to win a Grammy and to host her own weekly variety show on American TV. No cause of death was given, but Reddy was diagnosed with dementia in 2017.

Reddy officially retired from showbiz in 2002 — although she briefly returned to performing between 2012 and 2015.

Last month saw the release of the critically acclaimed biopic I Am Woman, starring Unjoo Moon.

An official statement was released by Reddy’s children Traci and Jordan:
It is with deep sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved mother, Helen Reddy, on the afternoon of September 29th, 2020 in Los Angeles. She was a wonderful Mother, Grandmother and a truly formidable woman. Our hearts are broken. But we take comfort in the knowledge that her voice will live on forever.

Helen Reddy told us that she first became aware of her spiritual side during an out-of-body experience when she was 11 years old: “I had fainted, but I was at the back of the room looking down. We were all dressed in identical uniforms, I was at school. And I saw that there was this body lying on the floor and I thought ‘Oh my goodness, one of the girls must have fainted, I wonder who it is?’ And I zoomed in for a close-up — which seemed perfectly natural at the time — and I was looking at myself.”

AUDIO: HELEN REDDY ON CHILDHOOD OUT OF BODY EXPERIENCE

DAVID CROSBY CALLS NEIL YOUNG ‘AN EVOCATIVE, BUT NOT A GREAT SINGER’

David Crosby critiqued his estranged bandmate Neil Young when a fan pressed him for his opinion via his Twitter feed. The fan posted to “Croz”: “David. I’ve considered Neil Young, not only a great songwriter and musician but a wonderful representation of Canada. Clearly, you’ve spent many years working with him. Is he held in as high revere by the music community you know as much as he is by Canadians?”

Crosby responded: “Probably yes. . . people who love songs as an art form pretty much went for him whole hog early on just on quality in songwriting. . . he is an evocative but not great singer, fine guitarist and regarded well by his fans and his peers.”

David Crosby told us that it was clear that Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Young was never going to remain a band for very long due to the fact that Neil Young always had several other musical projects cooking on the back burner: “Y’know, you gotta understand, Neil didn’t mean to join a band. To Neil, CSNY was a stepping stone. Y’know, he intended to have a solo career. He had seen what being in the Buffalo Springfield was like, he liked being by himself much better, he had Harvest ready to go when we were doing (CSNY) and he had every intention of moving on. And all of us had thoughts like that. I knew that Nash and I had something special and I knew that we could go out and do Crosby-Nash anytime and it would be good. It would be really good music.”

AUDIO: DAVID CROSBY ON NEIL YOUNG HAVING A SOLO CAREER